Posts Tagged ‘Southwark’

Week 3: Notes From London: Above & Below

April 22, 2015

Here it is, week 3 of my Notes From London: Above & Below campaign: 17% funded with 17 days to go to meet my $3,000 goal. I’ve been busy publicizing here and wherever else I can think of, social media-wise and on the street, while heading towards the philosophical bent of mind. I love this project; not only has it been several years in the making, but it represents an important period in my life vis á vis a special family member who lived in London for many years and who has always been a great influence on my work; inspiring this book in no small measure. That said, the images I’ve chosen are not necessarily personal but they are intended as memes, as reminders for us to look beyond what is in front of us and ‘see’ or imagine a much deeper picture and story. So, as promised last week, here is another image for your consideration, a detail from ‘Neo-Medieval On The 343’:

I hope you all will continue to help this project gain momentum and spread the word to friends and colleagues worldwide! Every little success gives an artist hope and like fuel for your cars, that keeps us wanting to make things that make you smile!

A Transparency Of Time

November 4, 2011

This latest drawing from my ‘Notes From The London Underground’ series emerged from a journal sketch of a ‘neo-medieval’ young woman in her ‘urban armor’ traveling on the 343 bus from Southwark to Elephant & Castle in London. Though she is not technically on the ‘Tube’, I’m expanding the series to include observations from other means of transport. I particularly liked seeing the variety of colorful upholstery on both tube and bus. I later learned that the ‘DNA-esque’ moquette pattern called ‘Chevron’  shown here is one of a series designed in 1938 by Enid Marx for the London Passenger Transport Board. As I studied the young woman’s hyperbolic knit beanie, the image of a medieval Flemish portrait flashed to mind and I realized that although London is situated on an isle separated from ‘The Continent’ by the English Channel, its cultural identity is a pastiche of pan-European and global sensibilities unfettered by the constructs of time…